Spring Refresh Guide:
4 Easy Tricks For A Seasonal Update

by Roxanne's Dried Flowers

It’s that time of year again! The trees are budding, the tulips are sprouting and the birds are singing. As new life and beauty enters our everyday lives, we can’t help but reflect on the space we reside in. And as we begin to wrangle the dust bunnies and throw out evidence of hibernation, we share with you some of our favorite ways to embrace the season of new beginnings, Spring!

reimagine your entrance and front door

Start with the place that acts as the intermediary between the fresh, wild outside world and the one we control, the entrance. A space as important as within but easily overlooked, the entryway gives preview to what lies beyond the door. It’s the first greeting dear guests receive, the welcome back home after time spent away, and the friendly hello to neighborhood passerbyers. Not only that, it's one of the few places in our control that has the backdrop of the outside world.

Planters: Do you have planters that are in need of a post-winter makeover? Throw in some blooming spring bulbs, after they have bloomed take them out and replant in fall to skip this step altogether next spring! Pussy willow or curly willow branches are also a great choice in spring to add some height to your planters. 

Wreath: Consider sprucing things up with a seasonal wreath. While choosing your wreath, keep in mind what type of weather your front door is exposed to. In general, dried flowers will only last one season but some are hardier than others. Definitely stay away from preserved flowers as the humidity can allow for dye drippage. Also avoid delicate dried flowers if your door has no coverage and is exposed to wind and rain. 

Garland: Garlands aren’t just for the winter months! A garland can be made for any season and possibly just the thing your front door is missing. A simple angel vine garland can make a huge difference yet be just the simple solution your entrance was needing. For spring and summer months, it is best to keep it simple and hardy to withstand the heat. Branches and vines are always a safe bet. A hardy dried flower can also do the trick, such as broom bloom and naturally dried grasses. A few other hardy naturally dried elements are happy flowers, palm spears, safflower, german statice, marcela and craspedia!

 

 

add plants to your home

Indoor plants have been around since the ancient Greek and Romans and it is no wonder we have continued to implement them in our homes all these years later. Not only do they assist in the appearance and styling of our homes, they also help eliminate pollutants and cleanse the air. They also help boost our mood, reducing stress and anxiety. But what plants do you choose? Think about the light in your house, how much effort you are willing to give, and your plant experience. Bright light, bright indirect light, and shade are going to be your main groups of plants. Some will sustain in different kinds of light, but usually for a plant to flourish you will want to stick to the optimal amount of light. If you are looking for something fool-proof with no experience necessary, try a ZZ plant, sansevieria, pothos, spider plant or aspidistra. All are very hardy and do well with little fussing. If you are looking for something in the medium care range, philodendron, alocasia, birds of paradise, begonia, hoya, succulents and cacti are manageable and easy as long as they have correct lighting and watering. For the seasoned plant parent, orchids, ferns, tillandsia, calathea, ficus, gardenia, and jasmine are all manageable with a little experience and attentive care. 

Now choose a spot in your house that could use a little face lift and pick-me-up! Decipher which kind of light that area receives, and research which plants will thrive there with the appropriate amount of care you are willing to give. Once you have one picked out, go find it at your local plant store! We recommend waiting to re-pot your plant until the next growing season so as to not add extra stress on the plant. If you notice it not thriving at first, that can be normal due to the new environment, continue proper care guidelines until it improves. If it doesn’t improve, contact your plant store for extra care tips and troubleshooting!

start seeds

Few things represent new beginnings like baby plants raised from seed. Most seeds need to be started indoors around 6-8 weeks before the last frost, which is on average around May 15th, so time is of the essence. At Roxanne’s, we offer organic seeds from Seed Savers Exchange, a nonprofit dedicated to the preservation, collection and sharing of heirloom seeds. Once you have your seeds, all you need is a seed starting tray, soil, and a nice sunny spot by a window. Give yourself the gift of waking up to new growth each morning and the eventual addition of hand grown veggies or flowers to your garden. If you're feeling nervous and want to take the beginners approach, start with easy flowering seeds such as zinnia, marigold, cosmos and sunflowers. For vegetables, castor beans, tomatoes, basil, peppers, kale, pumpkins, peas and broccoli are all beginner-friendly seeds to start with. 

garden books to inspire

Whether it be for the beautiful imagery or the meaningful text, a book on nature, gardening, or floral design can inspire and invigorate you for Spring and change. Maybe this is the year you get into gardening, or perhaps go down the spiritual journey of Ikebana floral design, or maybe get inspired by beautiful floral designs for your next painting project. Whatever book it may be, now is a great time to allow something new and beautiful to enter your world.

 

From entryway decor to plants, books to seeds, there’s plenty of fodder for reflecting the springtime world within the home. Find inspiration in our seasonal collection and tag us on instagram to share your own spring refresh. We’d love to see it! @roxannesdriedflowers